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RALEIGH, N.C. — The NCAA announced today that they will be returning championship events to sites in North Carolina for the first time since the state passed sweeping anti-LGBT legislation in 2016. The original law, HB 2, was replaced last month by a new law, HB 142, which continues to discriminate against transgender people.

“North Carolina’s new law does nothing to guarantee that LGBT people will be protected from discrimination” said James Esseks, director of the ACLU’s LGBT and HIV Project. “When the NCAA originally withdrew events from North Carolina, they did so because they claimed to care about ‘fairness and inclusion’ for college athletes and fans. It’s a shame to see that those concerns have already fallen by the wayside.”

HB 142 prevents state agencies, public schools, and local governments from adopting policies ensuring that transgender people can access restrooms matching their gender. Without such protections, people cannot fully participate in public life. HB 142 also says that local governments cannot pass ordinances protecting LGBT people — or anyone else — from discrimination in employment or public places until 2020.

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RALEIGH — The American Civil Liberties Union and ACLU of North Carolina are seeking documents from cities and educational institutions throughout North Carolina to establish how those venues intend to guarantee a nondiscriminatory environment for LGBT people if they are chosen to host NCAA events.

The NCAA announced this week that they would consider venues in North Carolina for NCAA championship host sites in response to the passage of HB 142, even though the HB 2 replacement leaves LGBT people, particularly transgender people, subject to discrimination.  It also said that potential host sites in North Carolina would be “required to submit additional documentation demonstrating how student-athletes and fans will be protected from discrimination.”

The ACLU’s public records requests were served late yesterday to Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh, Cary, and Greenville, as well as the following public universities:

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RALEIGH — Today the NCAA Board of Governors announced that it will again consider bids to host championship events in North Carolina despite the fact that North Carolina has replaced HB2 with a new law that continues to bar protections for LGBT people and ensures that transgender people do not have clear access to restrooms, which limits their ability to go to school, work, and attend sporting events and other public activities.

“North Carolina’s new law does nothing to guarantee that LGBT people will be protected from discrimination, and as the NCAA’s own statement acknowledges, the rights of trans student-athletes, coaches, and fans in particular remain in legal limbo,” said James Esseks, Director of the ACLU’s LGBT and HIV Project. “This is not an environment that protects people from discrimination.”

HB 142, signed by Governor Roy Cooper last week, prevents public schools and local governments from adopting good policies guaranteeing that transgender people can access facilities matching their gender. HB 142 also says that local governments cannot pass ordinances protecting LGBT people — or anyone else — from discrimination in employment or public places until 2020.

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RALEIGH, N.C. — The North Carolina General Assembly today passed a bill that does not repeal the discriminatory HB 2 law. Instead, it keeps in place the most harmful parts of the law.

The American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina is delivering a letter to Gov. Roy Cooper urging him to veto the measure — although Cooper has voiced his support for the proposal and is expected to sign it into law.

The new bill bars any protections for transgender people using restrooms or other facilities in schools or other state or local government buildings. This means schools, court houses, city halls, government agencies, and more cannot allow transgender people to use the right restroom.

It also prevents cities from passing any protections for employment discrimination or discrimination by places of public accommodation — for LGBT people or anyone — until 2020.

“This is not a repeal of HB 2. Instead, they’re reinforcing the worst aspects of the law,” said James Esseks, director of the ACLU LGBT Project. “North Carolina lawmakers should be ashamed of this backroom deal that continues to play politics with the lives of LGBT North Carolinians.”

The ACLU, ACLU of North Carolina, and Lambda Legal will continue to defend right of transgender people to use restrooms and changing facilities consistent with their gender identity, as federal law requires.  The lawsuit, which includes claims for the damages inflicted by H.B. 2, will continue, and the legal team will seek to amend the lawsuit to challenge H.B. 142 as well. 

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